The Daily Lottery Ticket

The Lottery

In this corner of Downtown LA, just at the Broadway entrance to Grand Central Market, people buy their lottery tickets. You can stand here all day and watch the people stream out out, intent on their tickets and scratchers. They rarely look up. They rarely notice. And if they do, they rarely care. This is the perfect position for a street photographer.

Player

Vendor

First Glance

Lady with the Blue Skirt

Lady in Blue Skirt

I’m still in the image harvesting stage from my Cuba trip. I have a good idea where some of the gems are located, just waiting for me to get to them. There are some sections of images I’ve hardly touched because they represent a big project. For example, I have a set of images taken off a rooftop in Havana. I know that I have a lot of culling and panorama stitching work to do in order to bring together the complete vision. So they sit and wait for a long quiet weekend.

This image, on the other hand, was a complete surprise. It was buried within a series of images I took walking along the Prado on afternoon. Sometimes, when I shoot, I see a theme but I just can’t get all the variables right. That was the case, mostly, with the images from that part of the day. Except for this one. I don’t even remember taking it.

Using Point of View – A short tutorial

Chevy and Che

com·po·si·tion:

a series of short tutorials on different compositional techniques you can use to make images with stronger impact.

Our responsibility as photographers is to show ordinary subjects in extraordinary ways, to point out what the casual or indifferent observer overlooks, that which the vigilant observer sees. Being attentive and alert observers is not even enough. We must show what we see in ways that capture the imagination and attention. We must show the world from an original and novel point of view.

Eye-level is boring.

Showing the world around us in this way means using your position to create a unique perspective or point of view. There are several obvious approaches including getting low, high, very close, using unusual angles, or obscuring your subject in interesting ways.

Get Low, Step Closer.

There are many images taken at eye level, but unless they use other strong compositional elements, they are just repeating the view seen by every other person walking around the face of this earth. One of the easiest methods for adding impact to an image it to get lower and closer.

Boy at Eye Level
Eye-level is boring

Get low, step closer, fill the frame
Get low, step closer, fill the frame

On the left is a simple image of a child playing on the Prado in Havana Cuba. The has a lot of potential with a cute kid, nice expression, and interesting color play, but there is no presence. The eye-level point of view has simply copied a simple scene and, and due to the camera position, there are a lot of details competing with the top of the child’s head.

In contrast, the image on the right was taken after taking a step or two closer and getting in lower. This image has great presence and is very dynamic. There are no distractions around the child’s head. You can use your position to bring your subject’s head and shoulders above the horizon line which not only removes distractions, but also conveys a sense of elevated stature.

Getting low put the head and shoulders above the horizon
Getting low put the head and shoulders above the horizon

Getting low and close also gives you the opportunity to show details and context as seen with this image on the rooster on the farm in Trinidad, Cuba or with these old American Cars in the heart of Havana.

Roster

Get High

By seeking a higher vantage point you can begin to show the relationships between objects and display graphic designs. Notice the use of horizontal lines in this image looking down on a street full of Taxis in San Francisco and the patterns formed by the stars and pedestrians on Hollywood Boulevard.

Late Night Taxi

Stars and Strips

Go Behind Something

Shooting behind something can add mystery, story, and context. Here is a two images taken from the back seat of a pedicab, or BiciTaxi as they are known in Havana Cuba. In each image I made sure to include the context of the taxi driver to ensure the point of view.

Tunnel of Lights

From the BiciTaxi

Don’t be Obvious

In summary here are things you can do to add Point of View to make your images have a stronger impact

  • Explore your subject from different angles
  • Get low, get high
  • Get closer
  • Shoot from under items
  • Use occlusion
  • Use wider angles

I Live in Trinidad, Cuba

Havana Morning Scene

Green Car Passes

Each morning in Havana, Kip Brundage from the SanteFe Workshop team, would lead a group on dawn patrol. At 6:15am, Kip would provide a dawn tour of an area in Central Havana so that by the time the light was up, we had our bearings and could use the morning light to make some photographs.
On the first Dawn Patrol, Kip lead us down the Prado and into a neighborhood situated north-west of the hotel.

One particular street had two competing Cafeterias, private residences serving coffee and pastries out their front windows, which attracted a lot of action and attention.

I stayed for about 10 minutes to catch several different daily life scenes play out.

I was initially attracted to this scene because of the blue car, lights on, and obvious concern by the driver. It is very common to see drivers out of their cars rummaging under the hood or in their trunks.

Is Something Wrong?

Just Checking

I took this image as the car began to drive off, it shows the full context of the scene.

Leaving

Some closer images

Three Amigos

Coffee Purchase

Footnote: Thank you to Glenn Primm, a long-time LA Photojournalist, who has been following my posts. He pointed out to me that my edit, while technically OK, didn’t convey the mood of the shots. He suggested that I bring down the exposure to match the morning scene. These are new edits as of Sunday morning.